Posts from the ‘Japan’ Category

‘The Interview’ watch full movie now, pulled by Sony Pictures from theatres ‘see below’

UPDATE: December 24/2014 – Just finished watching The Interview and my first impression, it is propaganda movie by/for the US Government. There were a few funny spots, but not anywhere near the best comedy I’ve ever seen. On a 1-10 it might be 4-5.

UPDATE: Sony is so scared about what the hackers have, they even gave in to taking down the YouTube preview, but you can view it HERE.

Simpson HouseNow we know what is expected of us in free speech countries due to the shut-down of one movie in two weeks. Artistic pleasure in the Arts expect that people doing such things, control what they put into a movie and do it discreetly, and with some clear thought.

I heard a good analogy today, we have freedom of speech but we are wise enough to know that we do not go into a full movie theatre (Not the Interview theatre) and yell out ‘FIRE’ this is irresponsible.

And we expect from movie houses, that they are allowed to express artistic artsy fartsy stuff, oh they call it ‘ART’ and use their common sense when making a movie and just think about what they are doing BEFORE they start.

In the end they will probably find some American 13-year-old boy in his Sony Pictured posters on his wall and a bong on the coffee table with all the stacks of hacked emails he just got off his 2GB mini laptop.

This is the newest and quickest way to bring Americans to their knees, if there was only another way of saying it. How very sad America, just when your opinion around the world had just started to improve.

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How does nuclear radiation affect animals?


Toronto, Canada
– Many of us are animal lovers, and we have heard very little about the effects of the nuclear radiation on the animal kingdom in Japan and near the Fukusima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.The focus is centred on the residents, but what about the animals? The devastation of the earthquake, tsunami and now nuclear radiation that hit Japan on March 11, 2011 has killed many and displaced thousands but we always seem to forget about the domestic pets and animals in the area.
The nuclear radiation from the nuclear meltdown at Fukusima Daiichi, Japan affects those that have survived this tragedy and that means animals too. It is estimated there are 30,00 domestic pets affected by this and many residents are bringing them to the shelters with them. There was a YouTube video that can be seen below of one injured dog standing by and protecting his friend as rescuers come to save the two. Although many forget about the animal kingdom, animal lovers from all over the world have been concerned for the domestic pets and wildlife and how the radiation will affect them if they have survived this incident.
Dr Joanna Coote, Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) from the Toronto Humane Society took some time to explain how the radiation could have an impact on animals and wildlife that could have survived the tragedy.

“I guess it depends which animals you are referring to, so if we talk about dogs, cats, horses, cattle, pigs, goats, sheep those are all mammals, so the way that animals are affected by radiation will be quite similar to humans, they often worry about the cumulative radiation effect so that if you are exposed to certain levels of radiation over time they’re worried that there would be a cumulative effect of radiation that can cause dangerous levels.” said Dr. Coote.
“In animals they don’t really have a prolonged exposure to radiation, because they have such a short lifespan relative to humans,” she went onto say about farm animals, “If they are farming dairy, goats or chickens, it’s the issue with, one, the real exposure to radiation the way we get exposed in the atmosphere so there’s that exposure and then there’s the exposure they get from the vegetation that they are eating. And it’s also in the water, the runoff and the rain.”

“Birds and insects will be affected as well and they can spread the radiation as they fly miles from the danger zone but they have a very low life-span and then it becomes a problem for the food chain as the bird eats the contaminated insect or the bird eats a contaminated fish that’s a concern and then flies miles away and then the bird gets eaten by another predator and the cycle continues”

Tokyo, Japan – “Japan National Police Agency, on Tuesday (March 16, 2011) said, dead and missing has exceeded 12,000 and is expected to go well beyond this figure. Out of this number 4277 are confirmed dead with 2282 injured from the tsunami and earthquake, not including any that may die from nuclear radiation.

On Sunday (March 13, 2011), police chief of Miyagi, one of the prefectures hardest hit disaster, said the number of death toll is estimated at more than 10,000 in its own territory.” Story from WorldNews
Ontario Veterinary College spokesperson Barry Gunn said,

“There really isn’t anybody that can talk about your questions clearly, in general, the assumption is that any threat would be the same as it is for people, these animals might be exposed to radiation from food or water, some of the nuclear isotopes have a short half-life, and caesium has a half-life of 30 years so they disappear soon after exposure and I suppose the caesium will be around for a while in the soil.”

Animal support Groups and interesting LINKS

Japan Earthquake and Animal Rescue
World Society for the Protection of Animals (WSPA)
Toronto Humane Society
Ontario Veterinary College Health Sciences Centre

World Society for the Protection of Animals (WSPA) has committed $150,000
Health hazards if exposed to nuclear radiation, Great LINK about radiation effects.

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Daniel … Toronto, Canada,     丹尼尔     دانيال … تورنتو، كندا،
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Translate full Blog into any language. Click your flag above, if it’s not there click any flag. It will take you to Google Translate.There will be a drop down menu for languages, find yours and click to the right.

(English is default language.)

Please comment what you think about the TRANSLATION full BLOG feature. I’ve been trying to add it for years and I think it’s very powerful, thanks Google. Tell us what you think, leave a comment.

Has Japan overcome the disasters, of Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear meltdown and the tsunami? Not quite

UPDATE: February 26/2011.

Saitama, Japan – The situation came to mind this weekend as the UFC 144  (Mixed martial Arts) was held in Saitama, Japan, just north of Tokyo and close to where the tsunami occurred, which hit last March. My first thought was, did UFC contestants and the media attending from all over the world, have second thoughts about attending the still radioactive area.

Read more about Japan and how the radiation is still affecting the animals HERE.

Many are under the illusion that the dangers have passed, but experts say it could take another 10-20 years before it is safe in the immediate area of the meltdown. Not a very bright prospect for the residents of Japan and the many animals who are still wandering near the plant.

I must admit, I will not be going anywhere near Japan, for a very long time.

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Daniel … Toronto, Canada
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@dandmb50

UPDATE: Animals still at risk at Fukushima’s (Nuclear) Exclusion Zone, Japan

Fukusima Daiichi, Japan – It’s almost a year (March 11/2011) since the terrible Tsunami/nuclear tragedy at Fukushima,  Japan and animals are still running scared and uncared for. It’s hard to believe but, many animals are still running wild, and very few have been rescued.

An excellent report this week on CNN (Video,) sheds light on the neglect of these animals, from domestic pets, to farm animals and everything in between.
The exclusion zone is an area of 20km surrounding the meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant and some 70,000 residents were removed by the government in March 2011.
Many were not allowed to take their domestic pets or farm animals and unable to return because of the high levels of radiation. The United Kennel Club of Japan (UKC) received authorization from the government to go into the exclusion area where the volunteers attempted to find and rescue as many domestic pets as possible. Many had already died from disease, neglect, starvation, but around 300 were captured and over 80% have been returned to their owners or remain in UKC shelters. The biggest problem with the residents of about 70,000 is that many of them are still homeless themselves, and are not allowed to care for their pets.
Sheep taking it easyMany have wondered if the radiation affects animals the same as humans and Dr. Coote from The Toronto Humane Society has confirmed it does, “I guess it depends which animals you are referring to, so if we talk about dogs, cats, horses, cattle, pigs, goats, sheep those are all mammals, so the way that animals are affected by radiation will be quite similar to humans, they often worry about the cumulative radiation affect so that if you are exposed to certain levels of radiation over time they’re worried that there would be a cumulative affect of radiation that can cause dangerous levels.”
She went on to say, “In animals they don’t really have a prolonged exposure to radiation, because they have such a short lifespan relative to humans, If they are farming dairy, goats or chickens, it’s the issue with, one, the actual exposure to radiation the way we get exposed in the atmosphere so there’s that exposure and then there’s the exposure they get from the vegetation that they are eating. And it’s also in the water, the runoff and the rain.”
“Birds and insects will be affected as well and they can spread the radiation as they fly miles from the danger zone but they have a very low life-span and then it becomes a problem for the food chain as the bird eats the contaminated insect or the bird eats a contaminated fish that’s a concern and then flies miles away and then the bird gets eaten by another predator and the cycle continues”

Many have already died from the radiation exposure and disease, and it’s unknown at this time when anyone else will be allowed into the exclusion area.

dandmb50flickr's photos on Flickriver
Daniel … Toronto, Canada
My take on everything
@dandmb50



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